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Top 5 Summer Sips

summer

Cool off and refresh with these summer sips, recommended by wine writers!

PR-DryRiesling_lion-143x4501. Dry Riesling

“As temperatures creep toward – even into – triple digits, we think more and more about refreshing wines to enjoy in the Great Northwest. And with summer’s arrival, so too shall we load up with bright white and crisp rosé wines.

Pacific Rim Winemakers 2013 Dry Riesling, Columbia Valley, $11: This Washington winery devotes 95 percent of its production to noble riesling, and a growing amount of its attention is being paid to dry styles. This carries a theme of white peach, dried pineapple and nuttiness, backed by baked Gala apple and Asian pear. (12.5 percent alcohol)” – Eric Degerman and Andy Perdue, The Spokesman-Review

Recommended: Pacific Rim Dry Riesling

 

Prosecco-Maschio_2013-175x450 2. Prosecco DOC

“And which wine should be in your picnic basket? I couldn’t have chosen a better pairing with the Raspberry Cobbler bursting with sugary fruit on a bed of cake like confection than this bottle of bubbles, Maschio Prosecco Brut Treviso DOC (sample) from the hills of Treviso north of Venice in the Veneto region of Italy.

Immediately after pouring, the bubbles were dancing and oh so ready for a picnic on a glorious day. Aromas of stone fruit and hint of orange citrus were enticing.  Fruit forward, thanks to vinification in stainless steel tanks (the reason I love Prosecco so much), with notes of apricots, peaches, and almonds, this wine helped make a picnic perfect day that much better. And the best part is that the Maschio Prosecco Brut Treviso DOC will pair with anything in your basket! Cost is around $12.” -Cindy Rynning, Grape Experiences

Recommended: Maschio Prosecco Brut Treviso DOC

 

Lambrusco-Emilia-0750L-153x4503. Lambrusco

“This popular Lambrusco from Italy is fairly sweet and medium bodied. With its low alcohol and even lower price, this one is good for crowds. Try it out during your next outdoor BBQ served with spicy sausages tucked in these pretzel buns. The wine is also meant to be served chilled, which makes it an even more desirable choice for a hot summer day.” -Janel Piersma, Wine 4 Me

Recommended: Riunite Lambrusco

 

CB_Rosso_di_Montalcino1-131x4504. Rosso di Montalcino

Warmer temperatures don’t mean you stop drinking red wine. Some of the best drinks for backyard barbecues and family picnics are red wines. The trick is to cool them down a little so that the tannins don’t overpower your palate. We recommend putting the bottles in the refrigerator for twenty minutes or an icy cooler for ten minutes before you’re ready to pour.

Next time you gather your friends together, whether you are grilling a steak, some Spanish-flavored lamb chops, a batch of pork chops, or even spicy sliders, try some of our favorite red wines for summer. And while we’re breaking the rules, don’t be afraid to pair an easy drinking red wine with grilled shrimp or other spicy seafood dishes.

Pair Banfi Rosso di Montalcino with Wild Game The baby brother to the famous Brunello di Montalcino, Banfi Rosso di Montalcino has only six months of barrel aging so that flavors of cherry and anisette with a touch of balsamic shine through. “ -Mike DeSimone and Jeff Jenssn, The Latin Kitchen

Recommended: Castello Banfi Rosso di Montalcino

 

PR_Gewurztaminer-143x4505. Gewürztraminer

“From Washington State, this producer is known for making excellent value Rieslings, but they also make this lovely Gewürztraminer. You’ll find fragrant aromas of grapefruit, lychee, apple, and holiday baking spices, followed by a crisp mouth due to its lively acidity and a bit of sweet residual sugar, making it a great choice if you decide to select a spicy sausage to fit inside these pretzel buns. The sweetness of the wine will refresh your palate from any spiciness in the sausage.” – Janel Piersma, Wine 4 Me

Recommended: Pacific Rim Gewurztraminer

 

 

 

Rebecca fell in love with wine — Castello Banfi Brunello in particular — on a cliché semester abroad in Italy. A Texas native, she has traveled to wine regions throughout France, as well as to Portugal, South Africa, and across the U.S. In addition to earning a BA from Duke University (Go Blue Devils!) and an MBA from Columbia Business School, Rebecca holds an Advanced with Merit certification from the WSET and was a founding contributor of the popular wine industry blog Terroirist.

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